Why Entrepreneurship Matters with Professor Peter G. Klein at University of The Bahamas, Thursday, March 9, 2017

First Published: 2017-02-24

Join us Thursday, March 9, 2017 for a lecture by Peter G. Klein Professor of Entrepreneurship at Baylor University’s Hankamer School of Business at The University of The Bahamas starting at 6:30pm.

Topic: “Why Entrepreneurship Matters”

Summary of presentation:

Entrepreneurship is increasingly recognized as a key driver of economic growth, technological progress, and an improved quality of life. But what exactly do entrepreneurs do, and why does it matter? Peter Klein surveys and critiques contemporary thinking on the entrepreneur, from the perspective of the “Austrian school” of economics, and draws out implications for business practice, public policy, and education.

This event is free.

This event would not be possible without the generous support of :

Templeton Religion Trust

Compass Point

AID – Automotive & Industrial Distributors

Bahamas Wholesale Agencies Limited

Go Ahead Biscuits

Arizona Drinks


Peter G. Klein is Professor of Entrepreneurship at Baylor University’s Hankamer School of Business, Senior Research Fellow at the Baugh Center for Entrepreneurship and Free Enterprise, and Carl Menger Research Fellow at the Mises Institute. He is author or editor of five books and author of over 80 articles, chapters, and reviews. His 2012 book Organizing Entrepreneurial Judgment (with Nicolai Foss, Cambridge University Press) won the 2014 Foundation for Economic Education Best Book Prize, and his 2010 book The Capitalist and the Entrepreneur (Mises Institute) has been translated into Chinese and Portuguese. He received his PhD in economics from the University of California, Berkeley, and a BA in economics from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He has held faculty positions at the University of Missouri, the Copenhagen Business School, the University of Georgia, and Washington University in St. Louis. He was a Senior Economist for the Council of Economic Advisers in 2000-01.

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